Here you can find all information about grass cutting and wildflower verges, during our grass cutting season.

If you would like to report an area that may require grass cutting, please click HERE

If you would like to request a verge to become a Wildflower Verge, please click HERE

When will the grass be cut in my area?

The first cut of the year will be undertaken when the grass reaches a height of 150mm in urban areas and 200mm in rural areas. 

Our grass cutting season starts on Monday 27 March 2017.  You can see when we are due to cut the grass in urban and rural areas by viewing our interactive map on our home screen.

How often will the grass be cut?

There will be a minimum of six cuts for urban areas. Rural areas will have a one metre swathe cut a minimum of twice a year.

Some Parishes choose to organise their own grass cutting.  Please see ‘Parishes that organise their own grass cutting’ for more information.

Why is the grass still high following the cut?

The grass is cut to a height between 30mm and 50mm in urban areas and between 50mm and 100mm in rural areas.

Why do you not pick up the grass clippings?

Grass clippings are relatively short & mulch down quickly which also slows down regrowth. Raking up, loading, transporting & getting rid of grass cuttings would also increase the cost of the grass cutting by around 12 times so this is not an option at the moment. 

Why have the edges not been strimmed?

Strimming usually takes place within 24 hours of the grass being cut.

Why has an area not been cut?

There are several reasons why the grass may not have been cut:

  • If the area is a designated wildflower site it will only be cut once the annual flowering has completed.  These areas are usually cut in September.
  • If the area is cut by the District or Parish Council.
  • If the section of grass is on private land.

A road junction is very overgrown, can you do anything?

The local Highway Steward will inspect the junction and will arrange a cut if it is a safety issue. If it is not deemed as a safety hazard, then it will be done when cyclical grass cutting is in the area.

I have a query regarding grass cutting in parks, gardens, council houses or schools

These areas fall under the responsibility of the District or Borough Council

Grass cutting in rural areas

In rural areas we aim to maintain the balance between pedestrian and driver safety and protecting the environment.

Roadside verges provide a habitat for many rare species, which need to be protected. These are identified and marked out for special maintenance. We will not cut these areas between 1 March – 31 August.

It is important to cut verges in rural areas regularly to:

  • maintain visibility, particularly at junctions
  • prevent grass overhanging roads and pavements
  • stop road signs being covered
  • reduce the chance of shrubs such as brambles taking hold.

Do you cut grass in all rural areas?

We don’t cut grass in all rural areas as it is simply not practical. We don’t cut steep slopes and embankments unless they are directly next to a road, and then only if the vegetation would hang over the road. We cut verges next to any pavements.

I have a grass verge outside my house which I like to cut myself. Is that ok?

We know that some people like to cut the grass near their home more often than we do. You should be aware of the possible risk of injury to yourself, passing pedestrians and traffic.

Wildflower verges

We have selected verges across the county known as wildflower verges, which have been identified as having rare species of wildflowers and mammals.  Roadside verges can provide a habitat for many rare species of wildflowers and mammals, which need to be protected.

To help maintain these habitats we make sure that we do not cut our wildflower verges between 1 March and 31 August.  This allows for bird nesting season and for the wildflowers to seed.

The wildflower verges are marked with small yellow indicators.  These help our grass cutting team to know what time of year to carry out their cuts.

How does East Sussex Highways look after wildflower verges?

We have selected verges across the county known as wildflower verges, which have been identified as having rare species of wildflowers and mammals. 

Roadside verges can provide a habitat for many rare species of wildflowers and mammals, which need to be protected.  To help maintain these habitats we make sure that we do not cut our wildflower verges between 1 March and 31 August.  This allows for bird nesting season and for the wildflowers to seed.  

The wildflower verges are marked with small yellow indicators.  These help our grass cutting team to know what time of year to carry out their cuts.

How do I request for a verge to become a wildflower verge?

Let us know the specific location and types of wild flower and/or the wildlife that are using the habitat.  The Ecological Officer for East Sussex County Council will then assess the location to decide whether it is suitable to become a designated wildflower verge.

Contact customer@eastsussexhighway.com with the above details if you have a verge which you would like to become a wildflower verge.