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Can we have a grit bin?

For a new grit bin please contact your local Residents Association, Town or Parish Council in the first instance to find out whether they would be willing to provide one.  If they agree to your request, they will contact us directly.  We will review the request and if approved, agree a suitable location.  Bins can be located on the highway, private or council owned land, with the landowner’s permission.

For contact details of your parish or town council please visit East Sussex County Council's website.
 

When will you fill the grit bin?

We inspect and fill all of East Sussex County Council owned grit bins once a year, in the autumn. 

Grit bins owned by Residents Associations, Town/Parish Councils – The owner must ask for a bin to be refilled by contacting our Customer Contact Centre and making an advance payment.  We will then arrange for the new bin to be refilled. 

Can you repair a broken grit bin?

If the grit bin is owned by East Sussex County Council, we will be responsible for its maintenance.  If the grit bin is privately owned, please contact the Residents Associations, Town or Parish Council who are responsible for it.
 

There is litter in a grit bin. Can it be cleared?

If there is litter in a grit bin you will need to contact your local district or borough council.   
 

How do I spread grit safely?
  • Wear bright clothing so that you can be seen easily

  • ​Only spread the grit when there are no vehicles or pedestrians nearby

  • Don't assume that the road or pavement is safe just because it has been gritted

  •  Look after the environment and use the minimum grit necessary

  • A shovel full of grit will be sufficient for 20/30 metres of road

 

​Can I buy salt from you?

We do not provide salt to private individuals or businesses, unless the business or a resident’s association has purchased an approved grit bin from East Sussex County Council.  Rock salt can be obtained from some builders’ merchants and DIY stores.

Gritting and Gritbins report »
Gritter Tracking
 

To track our gritter, click HERE

Why was a gritter going along the road but not treating it?

There are a several reasons why a gritter might not be treating the road:

  • Gritters follow a detailed route, treating primary roads in a specific area.  For maximum efficiency, the gritter will need to use some intersecting roads to get to the Primary Routes.  It is not feasible to salt these intersecting roads as the gritter would not have enough salt to treat the Primary Routes.

  • The gritter may be empty and returning to the depot after completing its run.

  • When the gritter lorry is using its snow ploughs, salt is not always applied.
     

When will my road be gritted?
  • We schedule our gritters based on weather forecasts and road surface temperatures.  

  • Our gritters treat the roads to try and stop the frost and ice forming before temperatures fall below freezing.  

  • Where possible we try and plan the gritting operation to occur after the evening peak hours and before the morning peak hours.

  • If your road is not on a primary or secondary gritting route it will not be gritted.  To view our gritting routes please visit our interactive map on our home screen.

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A gritter lorry has sprayed my car.  Can this cause damage?

We use small sized rock salt which is extremely light, not very dense and is unlikely to cause damage to vehicles.
 

Why has one side of the road been gritted but not the side that my house is on?

The gritter only needs to drive along one side of the road as the salt spreading mechanism is designed to deliver the salt across the full width of the road.
 

Why don’t you grit pavements?

We don't have the resources to routinely grit footpaths or pavements.  We encourage residents to help themselves by clearing snow and ice from public areas near their properties.  For more advice please visit  Clear snow from a road, path or cycleway – GOV.UK

 

Which roads do you grit?

See a map of gritting routes in East Sussex

When icy conditions are forecast we will grit all primary routes first. We grit 42% of the roads in East Sussex. This is all A and B roads and some C roads.

We give priority to the C roads leading to:

  • Hospitals, fire, ambulance and police stations
  • bus and railway stations
  • most main shopping areas and schools
  • difficult sites (very steep hills etc)

Gritters followed detailed, planned routes. Sometimes a gritter may be moving but not putting down any salt because:

  • it is travelling to the start of the route
  • in order to complete its route, it has to travel along roads which are not part of that route
  • it has finished and is returning to the depot.
Deciding when to grit

We use the latest weather forecasting technology to decide when we need to grit the roads. This can often be different to other forecasts such as those on the television or radio.

We aim to grit the roads before frost and ice are formed by freezing temperatures. Rain or snow can wash salt away, so we try to grit after rain has passed but before the road surface freezes. Where possible, we avoid the morning and evening rush hours.

Gritting decisions are made at least once a day, sometimes more in colder weather.

Why grit the road?

Grit is another name for salt. It helps to keep our roads safe by lowering the temperature at which water freezes, reducing the risk of ice. This process takes time and needs traffic moving over it to start working.

The gritter only needs to drive along one side of the road, as the gritter is designed to spread the salt across the full width of the road.

Why don't you grit pavements?

We don’t have the resources to routinely grit footpaths or pavements. We have to prioritise major roads rather than pavements to prevent the most serious accidents.

We encourage residents to help themselves by clearing snow and ice from public areas near their properties.

For more advice, see:

Grit bins

We currently have over 900 grit bins spread around the county. We are working with residents’ associations, as well as parish, district and borough councils where they may wish to buy their own additional grit bins. For further infomation, see:

Advice for winter driving

If the weather is bad and the roads are icy then do not drive unless it is essential. If you do need to travel, see more advice from the Met Office – Get ready for winter.

Advice for driving through fords

The AA have advice on driving through fords – Crossing a river at a ford.
 

How do I find out if schools are open during winter weather?

You can find out if schools are open by:

 

Our Winter fact sheet is available below

 

Gritting and Gritbins report »

For a new grit bin please contact your local Residents Association, Town or Parish Council in the first instance to find out whether they would be willing to provide one.  If they agree to your request, they will contact us directly.  We will review the request and if approved, agree a suitable location.  Bins can be located on the highway, private or council owned land, with the landowner’s permission.

For contact details of your parish or town council please visit East Sussex County Council's website.
 

Gritting and Gritbins report »

These are roads that are normally salted during the course of a winter period as a priority.  They consist of A and B roads and about 75% of the C roads, which are the most heavily used roads in the county.

These roads are normally treated when the following road conditions are forecast:

  • Snow
  • Road Surface temperatures falling close to or below freezing where moisture may be present.
Gritting and Gritbins report »

These roads are not normally salted unless snow or severe icy conditions are forecast.  They tend to include major bus routes which are not included on the Primary Routes, link roads into villages/hamlets/urban estates and main feeder roads to local hospitals. 
 

Gritting and Gritbins report »